History

HIST 115.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History Matters: History of Education

This course examines the origins and development of the western educational tradition from Antiquity to the Rise of Mass Public Schooling. Derived from the creative interplay of several ancient cultures, the western educational tradition, epitomized in its quest for “wisdom, virtue, and eloquence,” came to face a series of major challenges as the West faced a series of revolutions in science, industry, and political life that transformed Europe and regions under European influence.

NOTE: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 145.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
HistoryMatters: Law, Crime, and Violence in Pre-Modern England

This course examines the cultural, political, and religious factors in the Western tradition that have shaped our practice and understanding of interpersonal, intergroup, and international violence. It also examines the development of theories and practices of peaceful opposition to violent conflict. This course will engage and challenge students to think about the use of violence in modern times.

NOTE: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 202.3 — 1/2(3L)
Formation of Europe 300 to 1000

A history of the West from the Christianization of the Roman Empire in the fourth century to the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire in the tenth century. Themes include: the survival of Romanitas, monasticism and the western Church, the barbarian kingdoms, the Carolingian Renaissance, and the rise of feudalism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 205.3 — 1/2(3L)
Europe and World in High Middle Ages 1000 to 1300

Cluny and the Gregorian reform; the rise of feudal monarchy; Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades; twelfth century renaissance; universities and scholasticism; new forms of religious life; the peasantry; medieval women; the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy; castles and cathedrals; feudal monarchies.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 212 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
History in Film

A survey of various film portrayals of historical individuals and culture. Popular ideas about the past are largely a creation of fiction writers’ and film directors’ depictions of the past. This course focuses on historical figures and their representation in primary sources, literature, and film. In this context, students consider several broad themes, including historicity and authenticity, contemporary appropriations of past ideals or ideologies. Through the study of primary source texts and related films, the student will explore the many interpretations of past culture and the ways in which historical ideas, figures and events have been used as commentaries on modern issues. May be taken more than once for credit if the subjects differ sufficiently. Consult with department for details.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 217.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Early Byzantine Empire circa 285 to 565 CE from Constantine to Justinian

In this course meet the Late Roman Empire as it transitions from the Classical Era into “Late Antiquity.” We begin with the Reforms of Diocletian in response to the near fatal “crisis of the third century.” We study the Roman Empire’s shift its center of balance from Italy and the West to the urbanized and Greek speaking East. With the conversion of Constantine and the coming of Imperial Christianity the basic structures of Byzantine civilization arise. The reign of Justinian and Theodora represent the acme of early Byzantium with the codification of the Roman Law, the building of Hagia Sophia and Justinian’s gamble on the re-conquest of the lost provinces of the former western Roman Empire.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Pre-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 215.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 218.3 — 1/2(3L)
Byzantium and the World 565 to 1453

Despite the collapse of the former western Roman Empire, the Eastern Roman (or “Byzantine” Empire) weathers fresh challenges presented by the rise of new peoples. These include the Slavs, Bulgars, Arabs united in Islam, Turks, and Normans as well as a resurgent Latin West under the leadership of the Pope. While medieval Byzantium begins to collapse under the pressure of its enemies, its vibrant culture, both in its religious expression as “Orthodoxy” and its secular expression as “Hellenism,” make the later Byzantine Empire a significant cultural and intellectual influence on the world from Orthodox Russia to the revival of Classical Studies in the Italian Renaissance.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Pre-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 215.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 221.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sub Roman Anglo Saxon and Viking Britain 400 to 1066

This course examines the period from the departure of the Romans through to the coming of the Normans. It was an epoch that saw the gradual conversion of the peoples of the British Isles to Christianity and (with the exception of Ireland) the redrawing of the ethnic and political map of the islands. The following three centuries from 800 to 1100 A.D., from the Vikings incursions of the ninth century through to the Norman Conquest of England were a highly formative period in the history of the Isles, witnessing the emergence of England and Scotland as identifiable political entities.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 213.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Medieval England 1000 to 1500

Beginning in the long twelfth century with the Norman Conquest of England, through to the War of the Roses and the rise of the Tudors in the late fifteenth century, this course provides an integrated history of England in the medieval period. Examining in detail the issues of community and social bonds, economic change, population change, disease, political structures, ecclesiastical structures and political upheaval, students will gain a foundational understanding of the process of conquest, the expansion of art and of a written culture, the impact of the warfare; also the relationships between lords and labourers; development of trade and urbanization, the spread of written culture, the development of the common law and parliament, and the relationships between Britain, Ireland, Wales and the continent.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s):3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 213.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 230.3 — 1/2(3L)
Christianity from Constantine to the Age of the Renaissance and the Reformations 300 to 1650 CE

This course is designed to introduce students to the changing role of the Christian Churches in those centuries when Christianity became a world religion and the dominant cultural institution throughout Europe. While the course focuses mainly on Mediterranean and European society, the spread of Christianity in these times included most of the known world and began to include the “New World.”

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level HIST or 30 credit units at university level
Note: Pre-1815. Students who have completed HIST 285.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Christianity in Modern Times 1650 to 2000

This course is designed to study the changing role of the Christian Churches in European society from 1700 to the present. It focuses on key turning points in the history of Christianity including the rise of Pietism and Methodism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, the Great Awakenings in America, Christian missions, and the movements and crises of the twentieth century. By studying the ways Christianity has adapted to social, economic and intellectual change in the past three hundred years, the course will provide a basis for a clearer appraisal of the role and problems of the churches in society today.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level HIST or 30 credit units at university level.
Note: Students who have completed HIST 285.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 283.3 — 1/2(3L)
Society and Rise of Science from the Renaissance to Industrial Revolution

A study of the development of science in the context of social, political and intellectual change between the Renaissance and the end of the l8th century. Special attention will be paid to the Copernican Revolution, renaissance technology, the tension between science and religion, and the early Industrial Revolution.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or 3 credit units of any natural science, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 307.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Seminar in Ancient Medieval and Renaissance Biography

History viewed through documents related to a single individual. Students will work from various perspectives, including social, institutional, cultural, intellectual, and gender history. Possible individuals to be studied include Peter Abelard, Elizabeth I, Erasmus, and Joan of Arc.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 309.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Crusades and Aftermath

Examines the socio-economic pressures and spiritual goals basic to the Crusades, military encounters, the organization of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem (1099-1291), and ensuing contacts between Christians and Muslims to the eighteenth century.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 320.3 — 1/2(3S)
Pagans Christians Barbarians Identity and Empire in the Roman World

This course addresses the interaction of diverse cultural and religious identities in the Roman world, especially from the rise of Christianity in the early Empire through late antiquity. This encounter between Christianity and traditional Roman culture is one often defined in terms of conflict and triumph, but it is also one of toleration and exchange: by the time Christianity became an official religion, it was also deeply Roman. In the process of tracing these historical developments, this course will likewise consider how cultural and religious differences are constructed, resisted and adopted. Readings include a combination of modern scholarship and ancient literary and documentary texts.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST or CLAS at the 200-level.


HIST 330.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Humanist Thought in Renaissance Italy 1300 to 1527

A reading course in the development of renaissance Humanism from Petrarch to Machiavelli. Topics will include the cult of the classics, the Greek revival, new trends in education, civic humanism, and renaissance philosophy, history and political thought.

Formerly: HIST 315. HIST 315 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 402.3 — 1/2(3S)
Aspects of Late Antiquity

A study of the cultural and intellectual history of Late Antiquity based on the reading of primary sources in translation. Topics include church-state relations, the survival of the classical heritage, education, the early papacy, influential women, early monasticism and the fathers of the church.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 403.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in the History of Early Medieval England The Anglo Saxon Renaissance

Designed to introduce honours history students (not necessarily specialists in the area) to the primary sources and historiography of the Anglo-Saxon Renaissance. Given the scarcity of contemporary documentary evidence for large portions of this period, it is important for students to become familiar with non-documentary primary sources. Such sources include those revealed by archaeology, numismatics, and art history. Scholars must learn to use these sources in their efforts to understand the existing documentary sources and place them in a wider historical context.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 421.3 — 1/2(3S)
Erasmus and Renaissance Humanism

Erasmus of Rotterdam was the world’s first best-selling author who lived amidst the transformations and upheaval of early modern Europe. Student seminar presentations will include: the origins of northern humanism; Erasmus and Thomas More; Erasmus and the classical heritage; Erasmus as satirist; education; biblical and patristic studies; spirituality; controversies with Catholic and Protestant critics; peace and toleration.

Permission of the department required.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 424.3 — 1/2(3S)
Catholic Reform and Counter Reformation in Italy 1540 to 1650

A seminar on Catholic Reform in Italy focusing on early projects for reform, the development of the Papacy, new religious orders, the Council of Trent and its implementation, the Roman Inquisition, and the Index of prohibited books.

Formerly: HIST 466. HIST 466 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.