Class Descriptions

Anthropology | Archaeology | Catholic Studies | Classics & CMRS | Economics | English | French | Hebrew | History | Interdisciplinary Studies | Latin | Philosophy | Political Studies | Psychology | Religious StudiesSociology | Spanish | Ukrainian


ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
One World Many Peoples Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Acquaints students with historical and contemporary approaches in Anthropology to the study of social and cultural variation.

Note: Students with previous credit for ANTH 110 may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 227.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultures of Central and Eastern Europe

Broadly considers society and culture in Eastern and Central Europe, how the region today is related to both the socialist and pre-socialist pasts, and how ethnography as a key research tool used by anthropologists helps to account for sociocultural changes the region is undergoing since the late 1980’s.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or completion of 30 credit units at the university level, including an introductory social science course.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 298 Special Topics: Cultures of Central and Eastern Europe may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 233.3 — 1(2L-1S)
Anthropological Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine

Explores the effects of post-soviet transition in today’s Ukraine on the lives, identities and practices of its people. The emphasis is placed on how ethnography – a key research tool of anthropologists – helps to account for the changes the Ukrainian society has undergone since the late 1980s.

Formerly: ANTH 298.3 Special Topics: Anthropological Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine.
Prerequisite(s): A 100-level course in the social sciences.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 298.3 Special Topics: Anthropological Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 235.3 — 1/2(3L)
Anthropological Approaches to Ethnicity and Ethnic Groups

Introduction and assessment of various anthropological approaches to the study of ethnicity and ethnic groups in a cross-cultural comparative framework.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111 or completion of 30 credit units at the university level including a 100-level social science course.


ANTH 236.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethnicity in Action Ukrainian Canadian Experience

This course introduces students to Ukrainian Canadian culture and ethnicity from the perspective of ethnic and diaspora studies. Examining cultural practices and heritage of Ukrainians in Canada, we will look at Ukrainian Canadian community development and early settlers’ spiritual and material culture. We will discuss major social cultural changes in the community life of Ukrainian Canadians as they were taking place throughout the last century and place those in broader historical context. To deal with the questions of cultural vitality, continuity and change, we will look at Ukrainian Canadian folklore and ‘high’ art as cultural practice and analyze the relationship between cultural heritage, cultural practice, and ethnic identity of Ukrainians in Canada.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 111; or 30 credit units of university courses including 3 credit units from 100-level ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST


ANTH 330.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)

Oral History and Storytelling Anthropological Perspectives

Offers an anthropological perspective on stories and storytelling events, their meanings, interpretations, and applications. Drawing on a wealth of scholarship generated by folklorists, anthropologists and oral historians, students will examine current theories and principles of oral historical research and consider the implications of storytelling and oral narrative in modern societies.

Prerequisite(s): Any anthropology course numbered 200-235 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 398 Special Topics: Oral History and Storytelling may not take this course for credit.


ANTH 354.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Ritual Spaces in Ukrainian Culture

By applying ritual and symbolic analysis to the study of culture, this course investigates selected sites of Ukrainian traditional and contemporary culture in which ritual plays a prominent role. A comparative perspective is applied with the objective to better comprehend complex processes of cultural continuity and change in Eastern Europe and multiethnic Canada.

Formerly: ANTH 398.3 Special Topics: Ritual Spaces in Ukrainian Culture.
Prerequisite(s): Any ANTH course numbered 200 to 235 or permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ANTH 398.3 Special Topics: Ritual Spaces in Ukrainian Culture may not take this course for credit .

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Archaeology

ARCH 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Human Journey Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

This course introduces students to the basic principles of archaeology and biological anthropology by examining human evolutionary and cultural development. The course follows the journey of humanity from our earliest bipedal ancestors, through the emergence of anatomically modern humans, to the eventual advent of agriculture and development of complex urban states.

Formerly: ANTH 112.
Note: Students with previous credit for ANTH 110 or 112 may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 116.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Near Eastern and Classical Archaeology

Introduction to the archaeology of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel and surrounding regions, Greece and Rome. The course examines how archaeologists use material remains to reconstruct ancient societies, focusing on the archaeological characteristics and cultural dynamics of major periods, and the relationship between human communities and the environment.


ARCH 244.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology and Cultural Development Ancient Israel and Syria Late Bronze Age to Hellenistic Period

Examines the archaeological reconstruction of cultural development in the regions of ancient Israel and Syria from the Late Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Period, focusing on methodological issues, major sites, and the defining characteristics of the cultures themselves.

Formerly: CLAS 244
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 OR 116.
Note: Students with credit for CLAS 237 or 244 may not take this course for credit.


ARCH 252.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Near Eastern Archaeological Field Work

Introduces students to the excavation and laboratory methods used in Near Eastern archaeology. Beginning with research design, the course leads students through the techniques of excavation in the field to the analysis of artifacts and data in the lab.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Archaeology or 30 credit units at the university.


ARCH 257.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology of Ancient Egypt

A study of the archaeological evidence for the reconstruction of ancient Egyptian culture from the Neolithic through to the Roman periods, focusing on the particular characteristics of archaeology in Egypt, major cultural periods, and significant sites.

Formerly: ANTH 257.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or 116.


ARCH 258.3 — 1/2(3L)
Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia

A study of the archaeological evidence for the development of the cultures of ancient Mesopotamia from the Neolithic through to the Persian periods, focusing on the particular characteristics of Mesopotamian archaeology, major cultural periods, significant sites, and the relation of urban centres to the surrounding regions.

Formerly: ANTH 258.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 112 or 116.


ARCH 356.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Development of Complex Cultures in Eastern Mediterranean and Near Eastern Regions

A study of the development of complex cultures in the eastern Mediterranean and Near Eastern regions from the hunting and gathering societies of the Upper Palaeolithic period to the establishment of complex urban cultures during the Early Bronze Age, with an emphasis on the geographical areas of ancient Syria and Israel.

Formerly: ANTH 356
Prerequisite(s): One of ARCH 243, 244, 250 or 251.


ARCH 385.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
Computer Applications in Archaeology

Explores the interaction between archaeological theory, excavation methods, and modes of analysis, and various computer applications, such as databases, computer assisted mapping and drawing programs, and geographic information systems utilized in archaeological research.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250, 251 and an additional 6 credit units of archaeology at the 200/300 level or permission of the department.


ARCH 452.3 — 1/2(3L)
Selected Topics in Archaeology

Formerly: ANTH 452.
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 251 and 3 credit units in senior archaeology.


ARCH 465.3 — 1/2(3L)
Spatial Analysis of Archaeological Data

Spatial analysis examines the distribution of artifacts, ecofacts and features in the archaeological record and assesses the extent to which the distribution reflects past human activity, social structures, etc. Familiarizes students with theories of spatial analysis and provides practical experience in applying these theories to archaeological data.

Formerly: ANTH 465.
Prerequisite(s): A 300-level course in archaeology or ARCH 243 or 244.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 251 and 3 credit units in senior archaeology.

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Catholic Studies

CTST 200.3 - 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Catholicism

Provides a brief introduction to the academic study of Catholicism in its ecclesial, intellectual, and cultural expressions from antiquity to the present. A variety of texts are used to illustrate how Catholic faith and theology have played a role in science, philosophy, and the arts.

Prerequisite(s): 15 credit units of University study.

Note: This course is required for the Minor in Catholic Studies and can be used as a humanities elective in other Arts & Science programs.

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Classics and Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies (CMRS)

CLAS 104.3 — 1/2(3L)
Classical Myths

A study of the traditional stories of Greek gods and heroes with some consideration given to both earlier Mesopotamian and later Roman mythic traditions.

Note: May be taken as an elective only under Requirement 7 of Program Types A, B, C and D.


CMRS 110.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Graeco Roman Tradition Evolution and Reception

An introduction to the cultural and literary traditions of ancient Greece and Rome through the close reading of specific core texts. Emphasis will be placed on the development of key themes and values as they evolved in antiquity, and their reception in modern times.

Note: Students with credit for CMRS 201.6 or INTS 101.12 will not receive credit for this course.


CMRS 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Medieval and Renaissance Civilization

An introduction to the civilization of the European Middle Ages and Renaissance through the lens of literature, philosophy, art, and other sources.

Note: Students with credit for CMRS 201.6 or INTS 101.12 will not receive credit for this course.


CMRS 333.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5P)
Exploring Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts

Introduces the student to basic elements in the study of manuscripts. The greatest portion of the course will involve guided transcription, annotation, and analysis of manuscripts relevant to the research of the instructor. The texts in question will never have been edited and thus represent entirely original research. In part it will also involve learning about methods such as context function analysis, provenance research, and historical bibliography. Although this will be done initially through lectures, the experience of confronting pre-modern manuscripts first-hand in all of their richness will form the backbone of the course.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 200-level or above HIST, ENG, or CMRS or permission of instructor.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


CMRS 401.3 — 1(3S)
CMRS Texts and Themes

Many aspects of medieval and renaissance culture had their roots in the Greco-Roman Classical period. Detailed study of a selected text or theme and related scholarship aims to deepen understanding of cultural continuity and change between the three periods. Texts and themes will change yearly. Please consult CMRS homepage: http://www.artsandscience.usask.ca/cmrs/.

Prerequisite(s): CMRS 110 and CMRS 111, or INTS 101.12, or permission of the program director.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.

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Economics

ECON 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Price Theory and Resource Allocation

Shows the student how to understand the individual consumption and production decisions which are made within a market economy, guided by prices and costs. Economic concepts of supply, demand, cost, response to price changes, production, equilibrium, and income distribution are analyzed.


ECON 114.3 — 1/2(3L)
Money and Income

Shows the student how to understand the collective problems in economic policy, and the choices which face a modern economy. Social accounting, national income, consumption, saving, government spending, taxation, investment, interest rates, money and banking, foreign trade, and balance of payments are analyzed.

Note: ECON 111 recommended.


ECON 211.3 — 1/2(3L)

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Presents the student with a formal analysis of demand, elasticity, cost, production, firm and market equilibrium, competition, monopoly, oligopoly, factor demand and prices, general market equilibrium, and welfare.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.
Note: Students with credit for ECON 213 may not take this course for credit.


ECON 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Presents the student with a formal analysis of national accounting, the consumption function, investment, public expenditure, taxes, budgets, money and interest, IS-LM analysis of general equilibrium in an open economy, aggregate supply and demand, public policy, inflation, and the rudiments of growth theory.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114, and one of ECON 211 or 213.


ECON 270.3 — 1/2(3L)
Development in Non Industrialized Countries

A review of the economic development of selected countries. The relevance of resources, financial institutions, government action and regional differences to problems of industrialization in these countries will be studied in the light of past and current theories of economic development.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 272.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of Transition

Surveys core issues in transition economics. It discusses the legacy of the central planners, the progress achieved so far, and the need for further reforms. Topics include democratic transition and integration to the European Union, oligarchic transition, and gradualist transition. The course also introduces economic analysis of corruption.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 277.3 — 1/2(3L)
Economics of the Environment

An introduction to the economic analysis of environmental issues. It will include analysis of environmental quality, benefit-cost analysis, and evaluation of different environmental policies and their application in Canada and Saskatchewan. It will conclude with analysis of global environmental issues.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111 and 114.


ECON 314.3 — 1/2(3L)
Development Economics

Studies theories of economic development. Topics include human resources, financial institutions, sectoral composition, international trade, and income distribution.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111; and ECON 214 or ECON 274.3
Note: Students with credit for ECON 417 will not receive credit for this course. This course was labeled ECON 417 until 2013.


ECON 376.3 — 1/2(3L)
Energy Economics

Energy Economics studies a wide range of issues dealing with energy consumption, energy production, and energy markets. It covers a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to energy demand and supply, the energy market structure, energy policies, and environmental impacts in the national and global contexts.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 114; one of ECON 211 or ECON 213; and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123, or 125.


ECON 380.3 — 1/2(3L)
History of Economic Thought after 1870

The marginal utility theory, marginal productivity theory, neoclassical monetary theory and Keynesian economics; Menger, Jevons, Walras, Wicksteed, Marshall, Wicksell and Keynes, among others.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 214 and one of MATH 104 (formerly 101), 110, 121, 123 or 125.

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English

ENG 110.6 — 1&2(3L)
Literature and Composition

An introduction to the main kinds of literature. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note: Only 6 credit units of 100-level English may be taken for credit.


ENG 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literature and Composition Reading Poetry

An introduction to the major forms of poetry in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note: Only 6 credit units of 100-level English may be taken for credit.


ENG 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literature and Composition Reading Drama

An introduction to major forms of dramatic activity in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note: Only 6 credit units of 100-level English may be taken for credit.


ENG 113.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literature and Composition Reading Narrative

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note: Only 6 credit units of 100-level English may be taken for credit.


ENG 114.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literature and Composition Reading Culture

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note: Only 6 credit units of 100-Level English may be taken for credit.


ENG 202.6 — 1&2(3L)
Reading Canon Texts and Contexts

A survey of English literature with primary emphasis on the historical development of the British canon (including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, and Austen, for example), with some attention to the critical issues raised by the concept of “canon” itself, to non-canonical writers, and to other literatures in English.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 200 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 209.3 — 1/2(3L)
Transnational Literatures

An introduction to literatures written between histories, geographies, and cultural practices and produced at the borders of nations and languages/lects, when authors move from one national and/or linguistic context to another, or when peoples are dispersed from their original homelands and settle in diasporic socio-cultural formations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.


ENG 215.3 — 1/2(3L)
Life Writing

A study of the forms that Life Writing has taken from the Middle Ages to the present, with attention to such issues as constructions of the self, themes, language, and audience.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 370 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 217.3 — 1/2(3L)
Mythologies of Northern Europe

A study of the mythology of medieval northern Europe, including a survey of the sources, an examination of several chief deities and myths associated with them, and a consideration of some old northern European literary evidence.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 317 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
Shakespeare Comedy and History

This course will focus on the romantic comedies and English history plays that Shakespeare wrote for Elizabethan audiences in the first half of his theatre career; it will also include the darker, more tragicomic “problem comedies” that he wrote under James I.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level English; or 3 credit units English and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 225.3 — 1/2(3L)
Shakespeare Tragedy and Romance

Throughout his career Shakespeare wrote tragedies of romantic love, family and political conflict, and revenge, reaching his peak in this genre in the first decade of the 17th century. This course will focus on a selection of plays in this genre, and will also treat his late romances, a comic genre in which fateful adventures end in forgiveness and reconciliation between enemies.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 233.3 — 1/2(3L)
Page and Stage

Will examine English drama in performance and will be offered in conjunction with the offerings of one of Saskatoon’s theatre companies. It will focus on dramaturgy, staging, and interpretation through performance and will involve live performances, film adaptations, lecture and class discussion, seminar reports, and guest lectures from theatre professionals and drama scholars.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101; or permission of department.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 333 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 253.6 — 1&2(3L)
Canadian Literature in English

A survey of English-Canadian literature (principally poetry and fiction), with emphasis on the 20th century.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 353 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 277.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literary Uses of Mythology

An introduction to the theory of myth and selected examples of the classical and other myths most frequently adapted and reinterpreted in literature in English. Emphasizes the ways in which different writers can find quite different kinds of significance in the same myth.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.


ENG 286.3 — 1/2(3L)
Courtly Love and Medieval Romance

An examination of romantic love, chivalry, and the family during the Middle Ages. The course will focus on a number of medieval romances, but will also cover many areas of women’s cultural expression, including musical composition and mystical visions, and the tensions between the various forms of medieval women’s experience and models of clerical authority.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 386 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 293.3 — 1(3L)
Medieval Devotional Literature

A study of the medieval self in the devotional writing of the later Middle Ages. Discussion of theological sources, devotional art, popular piety, and the reading practices of lay and female readers will provide context for examining English mystics, such as Julian of Norwich and Richard Rolle.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG; or 3 credit units 100-level ENG and INTS 101.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 393 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


ENG 301.3 — 1/2(3L)
Old English Languages and Culture

Discussion of the importance of Old English language and literature for the Anglo-Saxon culture of early medieval England. Investigation of this language as foundation for the development of English. Introductory study of texts such as Beowulf and writers such as King Alfred.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 208 may not take this course for credit. This course was formerly labeled ENG 208.


ENG 310.3 — 1/2(3L)
Old English Literature

A study of several poems and some prose passages in Old English, including elegies, battle narratives, and a more extensive consideration of Beowulf than in English 201, including its backgrounds and analogues.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 301.3.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 208 may not take this course for credit. This course was formerly labeled ENG 208 .


ENG 311.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Canterbury Tales

An introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with principal attention to ‘The Canterbury Tales’.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 212 may not take this course for credit. This course was formerly labeled ENG 212.


ENG 312.3 — 1/2(3L)
Early Chaucer Dream and Romance Tragedy

The course examines Geoffrey Chaucer’s literary works before The Canterbury Tales, namely, the dream visions and the romance tragedy Troilus and Criseyde.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level English.


ENG 313.3 — 1/2(3L)
Middle English Romances

An introduction to late medieval stories of adventure, through the Middle English romance genre and its contexts.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 212 may not take this course for credit. This course was formerly labeled ENG 212.


ENG 314.3 — 1/2(3L)
Early British Drama

An introduction to the varieties of drama produced in the British Isles up to the inception of permanent theatres in late 16th-century London.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 316.3 — 1/2(3L)
Middle English Literature of Defiance and Dissent

In England, the late Middle Ages (1100-1500) were a time of social and political upheaval as well as literary innovation. This course examines Middle English literary texts that reflected and participated in historical and intellectual change and debate.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 341.3 — 1/2(3L)
The British Novel 1850 to 1900

A study of the development of the British novel, beginning with the mature work of Charles Dickens and George Eliot, and culminating in the late century work of authors such as Meredith, Hardy, Stevenson, and Wilde.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 374 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 344.3 — 1(3L)
American Literature 1865 to 1914

A survey of American literature and literary movements from the end of the Civil War to the outbreak of WWI.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 355.6 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 345.3 — 1/2(3L)
American Literature 1914 to 1960

A survey of American literature and literary movements from WWI to the rise of the civil rights movement, including, at the discretion of the instructor, a consideration of the contribution of the American cinema to literary tradition.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 356.6 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 362.3 — 1/2(3L)
The British Novel 1800 to 1850

A study of the development of the British novel, beginning with Jane Austen and Sir Walter Scott, and ending with the early work of Dickens, Gaskell, and the Brontes.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 374 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 363.3 — 1/2(3L)
Approaches to 20th and 21st Century Fiction

This course examines major works of 20th- and 21st-century fiction, including short fiction, across national boundaries. Students will explore literary genres and modes such as realism, modernism, postmodernism, magic realism, and metafiction. Authors may include Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, Morrison, Naipaul, Rushdie, Atwood, King, Munro, Carter and McEwan.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 6 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 366.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced Creative Writing Fiction

Intended for students who have acquired some practice and skill in the writing of prose.

Permission of the instructor required.
Note: Evidence of practice and skill in the writing of creative prose as determined by the instructor. A special application, available from St. Thomas More College Rm. 146, is required for this course.


ENG 402.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Anglo Saxon and Medieval Literature

Permission of the department required.
Restriction(s): Admission to an honours program or permission of the department.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


ENG 406.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in 17th Century Literature in English

Permission of the department required.
Restriction(s): Admission to an honours program or permission of the department.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


ENG 420.3 — 1/2(3S)
Medieval Genres

Permission of the department required.
Restriction(s): Course only open to students in an Honours program.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.

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French

FREN 103.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Beginning French I

An introduction to the basic grammatical concepts of French. Instruction will be based on the communicative approach.

Note: Students with credit for French 20 (Grade 11 French) or French 30 (Grade 12 French) cannot take this course for credit. FREN 103 does not count towards a major in French. Non-French/Modern Languages majors can use FREN 103 towards the humanities or languages requirement.


FREN 106.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Beginning French II

A continuation of the basic grammatical concepts of French. The communicative approach will be used with greater emphasis on reading and writing.

Prerequisite(s): French 20 or FREN 103.
Note: Students who have completed French 30 cannot take this course for credit. FREN 106 does not count towards a major in French. Non-French/Modern Languages majors can use FREN 106 towards the humanities or languages requirements.


FREN 122.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Intermediate French I

For students who have an adequate mastery of the basic grammatical concepts of French. Practice in aural comprehension, speaking and writing, and an introduction to reading. The course meets three hours a week, and students also attend a laboratory/conversation tutorial for an additional hour per week.

Formerly: FREN 120.
Prerequisite(s): French 30 (Grade 12 Core French) or FREN 106.
Note: Students with French 30 or FREN 106 must register in FREN 122. Students having graduated from Grade 12 in an Immersion program, as well as students with an additional background in French beyond the Grade 12 level, will not be allowed to register in FREN 122 for credit.


FREN 125.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Intermediate French II

A continuation of the language study done in FREN 122, with more emphasis on reading. Students will attend a laboratory/conversation tutorial one hour a week in addition to three hours of classes.

Formerly: FREN 120.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 122.
Note: Students having graduated from Grade 12 in an Immersion program will not be allowed to register in FREN 125 for credit. Students with an additional background in French beyond the Grade 12 level should consult the Department before registering.


FREN 212.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)

Advanced French Expression I

A French language course that builds on skills acquired in FREN 122, 125 or equivalent. Some oral work, but emphasis is placed on the practical application of grammar through reading and writing. A contemporary register of language, vocabulary and style is stressed through the study of magazines, journals and newspapers.

Formerly: FREN 202.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 125.


FREN 214.3 — 1(3L)
Beginner French English Translation

Covers the rudiments of French reading comprehension as an introduction to translation from French into English. This course is aimed at students who wish to prepare themselves for advanced French literature courses, students whose programmes require proof of a language credit in the form of a translation, and is a prerequisite for French 314.3.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 125 or FREN 128.


FREN 216.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literature and Spirituality The French Catholic Novel in English

A study of selected works of three major Catholic novelists of 20th century France, such as Georges Bernanos, Francois Mauriac, and Julien Green. The course is intended for students in various fields of study (literature, philosophy, religious studies etc.) with an interest in religious and spiritual themes and their literary expression. The texts and lectures will be in English. The assignments and exams will be written in English.

Prerequisite(s): 24 credit units including 6 credit units in French or English.
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of FREN 423 and FREN 216.


FREN 218.3 — 1/2(3L)
Advanced French Expression II

Completes the grammar review started in FREN 128 and FREN 212, and enhances writing skills through intensive vocabulary exercises, precis of and commentary on longer documentary videos and a critique of a Quebecois novel.

Formerly: FREN 200.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 128 or 212.
Note: Students with credit for FREN 215 may not take this course for credit.


FREN 220.3 — 1/2(3L)
Masterpieces of French Literature

An introduction to literary studies in French. The course will combine two elements: how to approach a French literary text, and a general introduction to French literature. It will study a selected number of French authors from the different genres and the various periods of French literature.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 125 or FREN 128.


FREN 258.3 — 1/2(3L)
French for Business

An intermediate course in business French, introducing topics such as big and small business, banks, international business as well as material on resumes, letters and job interviews and basic information on computers and the Internet, focussing on both Canada and France.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 125 or FREN 128.


FREN 304.3 — 1/2(3L-1P)
French Phonetics Theory and Practice

Conducted entirely in French, this course deals with the theory and practice of standard European and Canadian French pronunciation, corrective phonetics, phonetic transcription and the phenomena of elision, liaison, enchainement and syllabification.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 218.


FREN 312.3 — 1/2(3L)
Perfecting French Style and Expression

A study of French grammar at the advanced level based on grammatical analysis.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 218.


FREN 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Francophone Literature of Canadian West

A study of the Francophone literature of the Canadian West from 1870 to today. Covers major writers in the novel, poetry and theatre. Students will be made aware of the representative authors and their works produced in French on the Canadian prairies.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 220 or 230.


FREN 398.3     
French Variations across Nations and Cultures
 
This course aims to study the main varieties of the French language across Francophone nations and cultures around the world. It will enable students to familiarize themselves with key differences between standardized, non-standardized varieties, as well as semi-creolized and creolized varieties of French as it is spoken and written in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and in nations of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Special emphasis will be placed on concepts of language change, internal and external variation, linguistic restriction, convergence and divergence, the linguistic market, and social networks. Students will also be introduced to the main variables and social factors used in variationist sociolinguistics. They will be required to make oral and written presentations, drawing on relevant cases in Canada and the French-speaking world.

Prerequisites: FREN 128 or FREN 212 or permission from the instructor


FREN 423.3 — 1/2(3L)
Literature and Spirituality Catholic Novel in France

A study of the three major “Catholic” novelists of 20th-century France: Francois Mauriac, Julien Green, and Georges Bernanos. Emphasis will be placed upon their religious and spiritual preoccupations.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 220 or 230.

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Hebrew

HEB 114.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Hebrew I

This course offers students the opportunity to approach and explore the biblical texts in their original language. By learning how to read Hebrew prose and poetry and by acquiring the knowledge of the Hebrew grammar, we will be examining several important features of the biblical text, including select prophetic, historical and wisdom material. By the end of this course students will acquire the basic familiarity with the Hebrew language and grammar.

Note: Students with credit for HEB 111.6 may not take HEB 114 for credit.


HEB 117.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Hebrew II

This course is a continuation of the "Introduction to Hebrew 1". It offers students further opportunity to explore the biblical texts in their original language. By learning how to read Hebrew prose and poetry and by acquiring the knowledge of the Hebrew grammar, we will be examining several important features of the biblical text, including select prophetic, historical and wisdom material. By the end of this course students will acquire the foundational principles of the Hebrew language and grammar.

Note: Students with credit for HEB 111.6 may not take HEB 117 for credit.

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History

HIST 115.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
History of Education

This course examines the origins and development of the western educational tradition from Antiquity to the Rise of Mass Public Schooling. Derived from the creative interplay of several ancient cultures, the western educational tradition, epitomized in its quest for “wisdom, virtue, and eloquence,” came to face a series of major challenges as the West faced a series of revolutions in science, industry, and political life that transformed Europe and regions under European influence.

NOTE: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 145.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Violence and Reconciliation in the Western Tradition

This course examines the cultural, political, and religious factors in the Western tradition that have shaped our practice and understanding of interpersonal, intergroup, and international violence. It also examines the development of theories and practices of peaceful opposition to violent conflict. This course will engage and challenge students to think about the use of violence in modern times.

NOTE: A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.


HIST 202.3 — 1/2(3L)
Formation of Europe 300 to 1000

A history of the West from the Christianization of the Roman Empire in the fourth century to the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire in the tenth century. Themes include: the survival of Romanitas, monasticism and the western Church, the barbarian kingdoms, the Carolingian Renaissance, and the rise of feudalism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 205.3 — 1/2(3L)
Europe and World in High Middle Ages 1000 to 1300

Cluny and the Gregorian reform; the rise of feudal monarchy; Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades; twelfth century renaissance; universities and scholasticism; new forms of religious life; the peasantry; medieval women; the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy; castles and cathedrals; feudal monarchies.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 212 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
History in Film

A survey of various film portrayals of historical individuals and culture. Popular ideas about the past are largely a creation of fiction writers' and film directors' depictions of the past. This course focuses on historical figures and their representation in primary sources, literature, and film. In this context, students consider several broad themes, including historicity and authenticity, contemporary appropriations of past ideals or ideologies. Through the study of primary source texts and related films, the student will explore the many interpretations of past culture and the ways in which historical ideas, figures and events have been used as commentaries on modern issues. May be taken more than once for credit if the subjects differ sufficiently. Consult with department for details.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 217.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Early Byzantine Empire circa 285 to 565 CE from Constantine to Justinian

In this course meet the Late Roman Empire as it transitions from the Classical Era into “Late Antiquity.” We begin with the Reforms of Diocletian in response to the near fatal “crisis of the third century.” We study the Roman Empire’s shift its center of balance from Italy and the West to the urbanized and Greek speaking East. With the conversion of Constantine and the coming of Imperial Christianity the basic structures of Byzantine civilization arise. The reign of Justinian and Theodora represent the acme of early Byzantium with the codification of the Roman Law, the building of Hagia Sophia and Justinian’s gamble on the re-conquest of the lost provinces of the former Western Roman Empire.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Pre-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 215.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 218.3 — 1/2(3L)
Byzantium and the World 565 to 1453

Despite the collapse of the former western Roman Empire, the Eastern Roman (or “Byzantine” Empire) weathers fresh challenges presented by the rise of new peoples. These include the Slavs, Bulgars, Arabs united in Islam, Turks, and Normans as well as a resurgent Latin West under the leadership of the Pope. While medieval Byzantium begins to collapse under the pressure of its enemies, its vibrant culture, both in its religious expression as “Orthodoxy” and its secular expression as “Hellenism,” make the later Byzantine Empire a significant cultural and intellectual influence on the world from Orthodox Russia to the revival of Classical Studies in the Italian Renaissance.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of university.
Note: Pre-1815; Other Regions. Students with credit for HIST 215.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 221.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sub Roman Anglo Saxon and Viking Britain 400 to 1066

This course examines the period from the departure of the Romans through to the coming of the Normans. It was an epoch that saw the gradual conversion of the peoples of the British Isles to Christianity and (with the exception of Ireland) the redrawing of the ethnic and political map of the islands. The following three centuries from 800 to 1100 A.D., from the Vikings incursions of the ninth century through to the Norman Conquest of England were a highly formative period in the history of the Isles, witnessing the emergence of England and Scotland as identifiable political entities.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 213.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Medieval England 1000 to 1500

Beginning in the long twelfth century with the Norman Conquest of England, through to the War of the Roses and the rise of the Tudors in the late fifteenth century, this course provides an integrated history of England in the medieval period. Examining in detail the issues of community and social bonds, economic change, population change, disease, political structures, ecclesiastical structures and political upheaval, students will gain a foundational understanding of the process of conquest, the expansion of art and of a written culture, the impact of the warfare; also the relationships between lords and labourers; development of trade and urbanization, the spread of written culture, the development of the common law and parliament, and the relationships between Britain, Ireland, Wales and the continent.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s):3 credit units HIST at the 100 level, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students with credit for HIST 213.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 230.3 — 1/2(3L)
Christianity from Constantine to the Age of the Renaissance and the Reformations 300 to 1650 CE

This course is designed to introduce students to the changing role of the Christian Churches in those centuries when Christianity became a world religion and the dominant cultural institution throughout Europe. While the course focuses mainly on Mediterranean and European society, the spread of Christianity in these times included most of the known world and began to include the “New World.”

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level HIST or 30 credit units at university level
Note: Pre-1815. Students who have completed HIST 285.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Christianity in Modern Times 1650 to 2000

This course is designed to study the changing role of the Christian Churches in European society from 1700 to the present. It focuses on key turning points in the history of Christianity including the rise of Pietism and Methodism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, the Great Awakenings in America, Christian missions, and the movements and crises of the twentieth century. By studying the ways Christianity has adapted to social, economic and intellectual change in the past three hundred years, the course will provide a basis for a clearer appraisal of the role and problems of the churches in society today.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level HIST or 30 credit units at university level.
Note: Students who have completed HIST 285.6 may not take this course for credit.


HIST 282.3 — 1/2(2L-1S)
Behind the News

This course will explore the history and historical debates behind contemporary events ‘in the news’. Each course analyzes a specific set of linked contemporary events and provides students with lectures and reading to help them make sense of these events from a historical perspective. Through such an exploration each course offering encourages students to understand the various ways contemporary events can and should be understood.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level or permission of the department
Note: Chronological and geographical designation will vary with instructor. See department for latest details. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 283.3 — 1/2(3L)
Society and Rise of Science from the Renaissance to Industrial Revolution

A study of the development of science in the context of social, political and intellectual change between the Renaissance and the end of the l8th century. Special attention will be paid to the Copernican Revolution, renaissance technology, the tension between science and religion, and the early Industrial Revolution.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 100-level, or 3 credit units of any natural science, or INTS 101, or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 307.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Seminar in Ancient Medieval and Renaissance Biography

History viewed through documents related to a single individual. Students will work from various perspectives, including social, institutional, cultural, intellectual, and gender history. Possible individuals to be studied include Peter Abelard, Elizabeth I, Erasmus, and Joan of Arc.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


HIST 309.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Crusades and Aftermath

Examines the socio-economic pressures and spiritual goals basic to the Crusades, military encounters, the organization of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem (1099-1291), and ensuing contacts between Christians and Muslims to the eighteenth century.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 330.3 — 1/2(1.5L-1.5S)
Humanist Thought in Renaissance Italy 1300 to 1527

A reading course in the development of renaissance Humanism from Petrarch to Machiavelli. Topics will include the cult of the classics, the Greek revival, new trends in education, civic humanism, and renaissance philosophy, history and political thought.

Formerly: HIST 315. HIST 315 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST at the 200-level.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 402.3 — 1/2(3S)
Aspects of Late Antiquity

A study of the cultural and intellectual history of Late Antiquity based on the reading of primary sources in translation. Topics include church-state relations, the survival of the classical heritage, education, the early papacy, influential women, early monasticism and the fathers of the church.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 403.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in the History of Early Medieval England The Anglo Saxon Renaissance

Designed to introduce honours history students (not necessarily specialists in the area) to the primary sources and historiography of the Anglo-Saxon Renaissance. Given the scarcity of contemporary documentary evidence for large portions of this period, it is important for students to become familiar with non-documentary primary sources. Such sources include those revealed by archaeology, numismatics, and art history. Scholars must learn to use these sources in their efforts to understand the existing documentary sources and place them in a wider historical context.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 421.3 — 1/2(3S)
Erasmus and Renaissance Humanism

Erasmus of Rotterdam was the world's first best-selling author who lived amidst the transformations and upheaval of early modern Europe. Student seminar presentations will include: the origins of northern humanism; Erasmus and Thomas More; Erasmus and the classical heritage; Erasmus as satirist; education; biblical and patristic studies; spirituality; controversies with Catholic and Protestant critics; peace and toleration.

Permission of the department required.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.


HIST 424.3 — 1/2(3S)
Catholic Reform and Counter Reformation in Italy 1540 to 1650

A seminar on Catholic Reform in Italy focusing on early projects for reform, the development of the Papacy, new religious orders, the Council of Trent and its implementation, the Roman Inquisition, and the Index of prohibited books.

Formerly: HIST 466. HIST 466 has not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of senior-level HIST of which 3 credit units must be 300-level or permission of the department.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

INTS 103.3 — 1/2(3L)
Writing for Academic Success

The purpose of this course is to help students become stronger writers. To the end of sculpting effective essays, the course will teach students the principles of good reading; essay structure; editing and revision; and the effective use of rhetoric. The course proceeds upon the premise that clear writing is rooted in sound grammar, and that even analysis cannot properly proceed without this basis. For this reason, the course will necessarily include instruction in grammar.

Note: Students are encouraged to take this course in their first year to maximize the opportunity to increase success in later courses. However, it may be taken as an elective requirement at any time.


INTS 202.3 — 1/2(3L)
An Introduction to Ukrainian History and Culture

This course offers a multidisciplinary introduction to Ukraine, its history, culture, and peoples from historical, cultural, political and anthropological perspectives. Along with an overview of major developments in Ukrainian history, culture and nation building, the course also focuses on the outcomes and meanings of these developments to contemporary Ukrainians, their neighbors, and the Ukrainian diaspora. Topics include — the rise and fall of Kyivan Rus and Galicia-Volhynia, the Polish and Lithuanian rule, the Cossack Era, the birth and decline of Hetmanate, the impact of Russian and Austrian Imperial rule on Ukraine, the growth of national consciousness in the 19th century, the first World War and the quest for independence, industrialization and collectivization in Soviet Ukraine in the 1920-30s, the famine of 1932-33, Stalin’s repressions of 1930s, Western Ukraine between the Wars, Ukraine during the Second World War, Soviet Ukraine in the 1950-1980s, and independent Ukraine in a global context.

Prerequisite(s): 15 credit units of university studies.


INTS 203.3 — 1/2(3L)
Cultivating Humanity

This course will explore what it means to be human, and to become humane, by drawing from a variety of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. It will provide an intellectual framework for understanding interconnections between the personal and the group on both a local and global level in relation to social, cultural, economic, and ecological issues. This course gives attention to an increasing awareness of the challenges associated with intercultural relations, fostering respect for diversity, and the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units at university level or permission of the instructor.
Note: The course may be used toward the General or Electives Requirements in Arts and Science programs. Students with credit for INTS 200.6 may not take this course for credit.


INTS 400.3 — 1/2(3S)
Critical Perspectives on Social Justice and the Common Good

This course is meant as a capstone for students completing a Minor in Critical Perspectives on Social Justice and the Common Good. Students will be engaged in a critical inquiry into current conditions of social life to inspire their participation in equitable and sustainable alternatives for our common social good. Core categories include cycles of exclusion, rural/urban justice, ecojustice and globalization.

Prerequisite(s): 36 credit units of completed university study including INTS 203.3.


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Latin

LATN 112.3 — 1(5L)
Latin for Beginners I

An introduction to the basics of Latin grammar, with particular attention to accidence.


LATN 113.3 — 2(5L)
Latin for Beginners II

An introduction to the main elements of basic Latin syntax.

Prerequisite(s): LATN 112.


LATN 202.3 — 1(3L)
Intermediate Latin I

Consolidation of basic Latin grammar and introduction to advanced Latin syntax. The readings of some of the less difficult ancient Latin texts.

Prerequisite(s): LATN 113.
Note: Minimum of 75 per cent in Latin 113 recommended.


LATN 203.3 — 2(3L)
Intermediate Latin II

Readings in continuous Latin prose texts. Introduction to Latin poetry and metrics. Latin prose composition.

Prerequisite(s): LATN 202.


LATN 400.3 — 1/2(3S)
Senior Latin

Advanced study, in Latin, of particular authors, works, or genres, with emphasis on the precise translation and analysis (grammatical, metrical, stylistic, historical, and/or literary) of the assigned Latin texts. May be taken more than once for credit.

Prerequisite(s): LATN 203.
Note: Pre-1815; Europe and Great Britain. Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.

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Philosophy

PHIL 110.6 — 1&2(3L)
Introduction to Philosophy

This course explores some central problems of philosophy through modern and historical texts. Questions covered include: Is the world as you experience it? How do you know what you think you do? Does God exist? What ought we to do? What is beauty? What is a mind? Philosophy proceeds by the presentation and evaluation of reasons for alternative answers to fundamental questions and leads to improved critical, evaluative, and writing skills.

Note: No previous training in philosophy is required or presupposed. Students with credit for PHIL 120 or 133 may not take this course for credit. Students with credit for PHIL 120 or PHIL 133 should take the one they are missing for equivalency to PHIL 110.


PHIL 120.3 — 1/2(3L)
Knowledge Mind and Existence

This course explores philosophical questions regarding consciousness and personal identity, the nature of reality, knowledge and justification, the existence of God, freedom, and the nature of the self. Philosophy proceeds by the presentation and evaluation of reasons for alternative answers to fundamental questions and leads to improved critical, evaluative, and writing skills.

Note: Students with credit for PHIL 110 may not take this course for credit.


PHIL 121.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to World Philosophies

Is reason universal? Is human nature universal? Or are these particular to specific languages and cultures? This course will address these questions through the study of a variety of different world philosophies. This course will look at the way in which a selection of world cultures (East Asian, Indigenous, Latin American, Islamic and African) approach basic questions of philosophy (What is the ultimate nature of reality? What is truth? What is a human being? What is our place in the world? What is good?)


PHIL 133.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Ethics and Values

This course explores fundamental questions regarding morality, justice, and beauty. Questions covered include: What makes a society just? Do we have obligations regarding what is right? What makes acts good? Are values merely relative? What makes something a work of art? Philosophy proceeds by the presentation and evaluation of reasons for alternative answers to fundamental questions and leads to improved critical, evaluative, and writing skills.

Note: Students with credit for PHIL 110 may not take this course for credit.


PHIL 140.3 — 1/2(3L)
Critical Thinking

An introduction to essential principles of reasoning and critical thinking, designed to introduce the students to the analysis of concepts, to enhance their ability to evaluate various forms of reasoning and to examine critically beliefs, conventions and theories, and to develop sound arguments. Topics include fundamentals of logic and analysis, definition, logical fallacies, and conceptual analysis.

Note: Students with credit for PHIL 240, 241, 243 or CMPT 260 may not take this course for credit. To receive credit for PHIL 140, 240, 241, 243, or CMPT 260, students must take PHIL 140 prior to the above mentioned courses.


PHIL 202.3 — 1/2(3L)
Philosophy of Religion

This course explores philosophical questions regarding religion, such as the existence of God, the problem of evil, religious language, religious experience, faith and reason, and morality and religion.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 208.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ancient Philosophy Presocratics to Plato

A study of the origins of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece to its most extensive development in the philosophy of Plato. Classical views of the ultimate nature of reality, the scope and limits of human knowledge, and the grounds for aesthetic and moral evaluations will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 209.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ancient Philosophy Aristotle to Plotinus

The development of philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome from the time of Aristotle to the emergence of Christianity. In addition to a survey of several of the most important aspects of Aristotle’s philosophy, this course will examine such schools of thought as Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Neoplatonism.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credits at the university.


PHIL 210.3 — 1(3L)
Medieval Philosophy I From Rome to Baghdad and Paris

The study of major thinkers of the early middle ages, including Augustine, Boethius, Eriugena, Anselm, and Abelard. Background will be provided to Neoplatonic themes that shape this period. Topics include free will, happiness, the existence of God, theories of truth, and the problem of universals.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 211.3 — 2(3L)
Philosophy and Faith Medieval Philosophy II

The study of major Jewish, Muslim, and Christian thinkers of the high middle ages, including Moses Maimonides, Avicenna, Averroes, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. Background to Aristotle and his tradition will be provided. Topics include the relation of faith and reason, existence and nature of God, human nature, voluntarism, and the critique of metaphysics.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 212.3 — 1/2(3L)
Medieval Intellectuals

An interdisciplinary examination of major intellectual figures in their historical and philosophical contexts from late antiquity to the end of the middle ages. Themes include the liberal arts tradition, the relation of faith and reason, the emergence of mediaeval science, the rise of Scholasticism, the mystical tradition, and the classical revival.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level History or Philosophy.


PHIL 215.3 — 1/2(3L)
19th Century Philosophy From Romanticism to Revolution

The 19th Century is an age of radicalism and reaction and its philosophy responds to the contradictions of its time by asking how we are to live in the world we create, raising critical questions about aesthetics, morals, education, religion, and the state. This course explores the major thinkers of this period from Hegel to Marx, and may include philosophers as diverse as Schopenhauer, Comte, Bentham, Mill, Nietzsche, and James.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 120.


PHIL 218.3 — 1/2(3L)
Existentialism

An introduction to 19th and 20th Century existentialist thought from Kierkegaard and Nietzsche to Sartre. Issues to be explored concern the human quest for meaning in existence and include the nature of the human self, truth, freedom, mortality, the significance of God, and the possibility of interpersonal relations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 219.3 — 1/2(3L)
Phenomenology

A survey of phenomenological thought, primarily of the early 20th C. This course will include authors such as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
Philosophy of Sexuality

What counts as sex? Does being in a sexual relationship with one person restrict our interactions with others? Is it ever okay to objectify someone? Should society endorse certain kinds of sexual relationship and not others? The focus is on philosophical perspectives on sex, sexuality, gender, and erotic love as we consider questions such as the nature of sex, perversion, masturbation, orientation and identity, homosexuality, objectification, pornography, prostitution, and other moral and political issues regarding sexuality.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 226.3 — 1/2(3L)
Environmental Philosophy

Philosophical issues concerning the human relationship with the natural environment, including ethical and political questions about how we interact with the physical world and its inhabitants and about the interpretation of the natural. Topics may include the value and rights of nonhumans, environmental aesthetics, the identification of the “natural,” ecotopias, and global environmental justice.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university


PHIL 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Moral Problems

This course examines a variety of moral issues, such as human sexuality, abortion, euthanasia, war and revolution, environmental ethics and animal rights, and prejudice and discrimination.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 233.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethical Theory

What makes an action morally right? Does it depend on what a moral being is? What makes us morally responsible? This course is an investigation of some of the most historically important theories, an examination of their fundamental commitments, and some discussion of contemporary versions of those theories. Philosophers studied will include Aristotle, Kant, and Mill, and others.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 133.


PHIL 234.3 — 1/2(3L)
Biomedical Ethics

An examination of contemporary biomedical ethical issues such as the definition of a person, determination of life and death, euthanasia, abortion, prenatal diagnosis and intervention, problems in the physician-patient relationship, reproductive technologies, genetic engineering and accessibility to health care.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 235.3 — 1/2(3L)
Business and Professional Ethics

An overview of ethical issues related to business enterprises and professional practice, including questions concerning labour relations, preferential hiring, advertising and marketing, as well as questions about responsibility to society, to the organization, and to the profession. The course may also consider theoretical questions concerning free enterprise, forms of business organization, and government controls and regulations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 237.3 — 1/2(3L)
Law and Morality

An introduction to philosophical issues regarding law and its relation to morality. Issues to be explored concern the nature and validity of law and the law’s proper limits in relation to topics such as freedom of expression, pornography, the definition of family and marriage, civil disobedience, abortion and capital punishment.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 238.3 — 1/2(2L-1T)
Ethical Issues in Scientific Research

Introduction to ethical issues related to scientific research requiring institutional ethics review and approval. Theoretical approaches in ethics and their relationship to national and institutional guidelines governing research protocol compliance are considered. Topics include Aristotelian, Kantian and Utilitarian ethics, ethical standards in designing research protocols, and protection of research subjects.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 240.3 — 1(3L)
Aristotelian Logic

The meaning of concept, term, judgement and proposition, categorical and hypothetical reasoning and induction; mathematical logic (Venn diagrams, truth trees, elementary deductions, syllogism). Frequent exercises will be assigned.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 241.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Symbolic Logic I

An introduction to modern logic. Truth-functional statement logic and first order predicate logic. Formalization of natural language statements and arguments.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.
Note: Students with credit for PHIL 242 or 243 may not take this course for credit, nor may students take PHIL 241 and 243 concurrently. To receive credit for both PHIL 241 and 243 students must take PHIL 241 prior to PHIL 243.


PHIL 262.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social and Political Philosophy

An examination of philosophical theories of political organization. Such issues as justice and power, rights, freedom and the public good will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy, history or a social science.


PHIL 271.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art

This course explores basic issues in aesthetics. What is art? Are aesthetic judgments objective or merely subjective matters of taste and feeling? Is it possible to have standards of criticism? Is art fictional and if so can it be true? What is the place of art in human life?

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy, fine arts or literature.


PHIL 274.3 — 1/2(3L)
Philosophy of Music

What do we really experience when we listen to music? Why do we appreciate the music we do? Do we appreciate music because of the objective properties in the music? Does it have to be beautiful? Or is music appreciation more a matter of subjectivity? Does music cause pleasure? Does it express something? Does it mean something? Is it like a language? How is music related to technology? Does music make us better or worse? What role does it play in society? What role should it play in society? These are some of the questions we will address in this class devoted to the philosophy of music.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units PHIL or LIT courses or 6 credit units in fine arts courses


PHIL 275.3 — 1/2(3L)
Philosophy of Film

This course explores philosophical questions that arise concerning film, including those involving the value, meaning, and ontology of film. Questions covered may include: What is the nature of film? What is the role of theory in the filmmaking process? Why do viewing audiences have the kinds of experiences that they do? What is the purpose of filmmaking? Is film a suitable medium for engaging in the practice of philosophy? What is the connection between the value of a film and its moral content? What role do the filmmaker’s intentions play in the correct interpretation of a film? The questions and theories considered may be addressed from the points of view of filmmakers, critics, philosophers, and viewing audiences.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 294.3 — 2(3L)
Philosophy of Human Nature

A philosophical examination of whether there is a human nature, through both historical and contemporary discussions. Will include topics such as the importance of narrative, biology and evolution, selfishness, gender, race, freedom, and personhood.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or completion of 24 credit units at the university.


PHIL 296.3 — 1/2(3L)
Nature of Material Reality

A study of the philosophy of nature which examines ancient and modern views on the material constitution of bodies, organisms, and persons. Major topics include the nature of substance, the distinction between properties and substances, artifacts and natural things, and the mind-body problems.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in philosophy or 12 credit units in science.


PHIL 302.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Philosophy of Religion

A study of major topics in recent analytic and/or continental philosophy of religion. Topics include the rationality of religious belief, the nature of God, religious language, the problem of evil, critiques of religion, and the interface of major world religions.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 312.3 — 1/2(3S)
Great Philosophers I Historical Figures

Detailed reading in the work of a major philosopher such as Aristotle, Hume or Russell.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 313.3 — 1/2(3S)
Great Philosophers II Contemporary Figures

Consists of detailed reading in the work of some major philosophers.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 315.3 — 1/2(3S)
Hegel

A study of Hegel’s approach and contributions to philosophy through a detailed reading of some of his major works.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 319.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Recent Continental Philosophy

Examines specific issues or authors in current continental philosophy. Areas of discussion might include critical theory, aesthetics, or hermeneutics, and authors such as Foucault, Habermas, Derrida, or Gadamer.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 337.3 — 1/2(3S)
Philosophy of Law

A critical examination of attempts to provide theories of the nature of law. This course will examine the debate between legal positivists and natural law theorists, as well as the reaction to this debate (e.g. Dworkin, legal realists, critical legal theorists, and feminists).
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 362.3 — 1/2(3S)
Topics in Political Philosophy

The topic, political philosopher, movement or theories studied will vary from year to year.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in philosophy or PHIL 262 or POLS 235.


PHIL 396.6 — 1&2(3L)
Metaphysics

Study of philosophical attempts to achieve knowledge of reality beyond the empirical; approached historically in terms of ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary theory; and problematically-in terms of present day concerns, such as space, time, motion, nature, existence, essence, God, soul, mind, idea, freedom, person, death, anxiety and art.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


PHIL 404.3 — 1(3L)
Advanced Problems in Philosophy and TheologyPhilosophical aspects of contemporary psychological and theological problems treated at an advanced level. Selected readings in Freud, Jung, Ryle, Merleau-Ponty, Marcel, Ricoeur and others.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units philosophy.


PHIL 412.3 — 1/2(3S)
Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas I

The philosophy of Aquinas considered in the areas of philosophical theology, metaphysics, and philosophy of nature.
Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units in philosophy.


PHIL 413.3 — 1/2(3S)
Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas II

The philosophy of Aquinas considered in the areas of human nature, epistemology, and ethics.
Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units in philosophy.

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Political Studies

POLS 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Democracy in North America

An introduction to the study of politics through an examination of contemporary issues and ideas that arise in and between the democratic systems of Canada, the United States and Mexico, including democracy, sovereignty, aboriginal issues, NAFTA, globalization, identity, rights, representation and political participation.


POLS 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
Political Ideas and Change in Global Era

An introduction to political ideas and change in a global era. The course explores themes such as nationalism, ideology, development, democratization, globalization, sovereignty, conflict and human rights.


POLS 205.3 — 1/2(3L)
Politics in Canada

Introduces students to the societal context of Canadian political life, including political culture, political sociology and history, social movements, political parties, political identities, regionalism, and nationalism.

Formerly: POLS 203
Prerequisite(s): POLS 111 and POLS 112; or 60 credit units at university level.
Note: Students with credit for POLS 203 may not take this course for credit.


POLS 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Aboriginal Governance and Politics

An analysis of existing and emerging systems of Aboriginal governance and politics at the local, regional, provincial and national levels in Canada.

Prerequisite(s): POLS 111 and POLS 112; or 60 credit units at university level.


POLS 249.3 — 1(3L)
American Government and Politics

This course examines the formal and informal processes of the American system of government. Topics include the institutions of the Presidency and Congress, the bureaucracy and their interaction, as well as the mass media and public opinion, political parties and interest groups.

Formerly: POLS 242.
Prerequisite(s): POLS 111 and POLS 112; or 60 credit units at university level.
Note: Students with credit for POLS 242 may not take this course for credit.


POLS 250.3 — 1/2(3L)
Understanding the State

This course examines various theories to understanding the state within a global context such as liberalism, realism, pluralism, feminism, Marxism and new theories of ecologicalism.

Formerly: POLS 252.
Prerequisite(s): POLS 111 and POLS 112; or SOC 111 and SOC 112; or 60 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students with credit for POLS 252 may not take this course for credit.


POLS 262.3 — 1/2(3L)
Global Governance

This course examines major international and non-governmental organizations and institutions such as the UN, EU, NATO, Red Cross, Greenpeace as well as the role of traditional states to understand how they work and to assess their success in dealing with various issues that challenge the international community. The issues considered include conflict and security, the environment, human rights, humanitarian intervention, as well as economic development and well-being.

Prerequisite(s): POLS 111 and POLS 112; or 60 credit units at university level.
Note: Students with credit for POLS 260 will not receive credit for this course.


POLS 303.3 — 1/2(3L)
Public Law and the Courts in Canada

This course introduces students to Canada's constitution with special emphasis on the judicial system. It also examines Canada's constitutional debates with specific emphasis on the judicial role in shaping federal/provincial division of powers since Confederation.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS


POLS 304.3 — 1/2(3L)
Charter of Rights

Will introduce students to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Special attention is devoted to the intersection between law and politics, including debates surrounding the introduction of the Charter, ongoing debates concerning judicial power and extensive case reviews.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS (Students are encouraged to take POLS 303 before taking POLS 304).
Note: Students with credit for POLS 307 Topics in Canadian Politics: Law, Politics and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms (offered in 2010-11 and 2011-12) may not take this course for credit.


POLS 305.3 — 1/2(3L)
Provincial Politics

An examination of the institutions and processes of Canadian provincial political systems with particular emphasis on Saskatchewan.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS.


POLS 307.3 — 1/2(3L)
Topics in Canadian Politics

An examination of major issues of contemporary concern in Canadian politics, such as constitutional and environmental issues and issues affecting women. The content of the course varies from year to year, but is announced in advance of registration deadlines.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level POLS or 30 credit units at university level.


POLS 336.3 — 1/2(3L)
Justice, Freedom, and Democracy

Justice and democracy are two key ideas in contemporary politics.  While we generally think they are harmonious ideas, often times they come into conflict.  This course addresses contemporary theoretical approaches to the relationship between justice and democracy.  Issues to be covered include, what is to be done when democracies reach unjust decisions, what kind of democracy does justice require and how can democratic institutions be designed to produce more just outcomes.

Prerequisite(s): POLS 236 and 237 or (formerly POLS 235); or PHIL 262.


POLS 337.3 — 1/2(3L)
Canadian Ideologies and the Pursuit of the Common Good

This course examines all of the major ideological currents in Canada such as Toryism, conservatism, liberalism, social democracy, feminism, environmentalism, English Canadian nationalism, Québécois nationalism, and Indigenous nationalism. Focusing on the various political parties and actors that represent these traditions, the course further explores how these conflicting ideologies purport to pursue the common good.

Prerequisite(s): POLS 236 and 237 (formerly POLS 235); or PHIL 262.


POLS 343.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ukraine Processes and Problems of Nation and State Building

This course examines the historical as well as contemporary political, social and cultural processes that have shaped Ukraine’s national identity while exploring their impact on current state-building efforts.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS.


POLS 349.3 — 1(3L)
The Public Policy of Multiculturalism in Canada

Provides an analysis of the factors that affect diversity and diversity management in Canada. Special attention is devoted to issues and options related to various diversity management policies and programs such as immigration, multiculturalism and interculturalism, anti-racism, human rights, and employment equity. It also examines Canadian diversity management issues and options within the context of various nation-building projects and rights regimes espoused by governments and groups in Canada.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS.


POLS 362.3 — 1/2(3L)
Global Political Economy

This course will introduce students to the foundations and theory of political economy including Classicism, Neo-Classicism, Marxism, Keynesianism, and Neoliberalism. The course will further introduce students to the concept of globalization, exploring how recent shifts in the global political economy have challenged the legitimacy of liberal democratic states.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units POLS or 60 credit units at university level.


POLS 370.3 — 1(3L)
War and Diplomacy

Seeks to identify and assess those issues that historically have generated conflict and examines the various political and diplomatic efforts that followed epochal wars to create international orders and mechanisms that would manage, control or prevent future international conflicts.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS.


POLS 372.3 — 2(3L)
Political Reconciliation

This course examines various approaches to peace-building in the aftermath of conflict, focusing on the restorative role of political reconciliation.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS.


POLS 375.3 — 1/2(3L)
Canadian Foreign Policy

Introduction to Canada's role in the world, studying the factors that continue to shape Canada's position on global issues and the processes by which Canadian foreign policy is made.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS.
Note: Students with credit for POLS 365 may not take this course for credit.


POLS 403.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Topics in Public Law and Public Policy

Students will be introduced to theories of law, politics and justice in modern Canadian society. In addition to examining judicial decision-making, the course will also question how law influences administrative actors with regards to such policy fields as labour, immigration, health, multiculturalism, the environment and aboriginal rights.

Prerequisite(s):
60 credit units at the university level including 6 credit units 100-level POLS.


POLS 404.3 — 1/2(3S)
Canadian Federalism

An examination of Canadian federalism that deals with enduring and contemporary issues such as the constitutional division of powers, intergovernmental relations, fiscal federalism, the federal spending power, regionalism, the role of Quebec in the federal system, and constitutional change.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS and permission of the department.


POLS 405.3 — 1/2(3S)
Canadian Elections

Elections and political parties are crucial components of Canadian democracy. This course explores the ideology and organization of Canadian political parties as well as how these parties interact with the media and the role they play in our parliamentary institutions.  The course will also examine various aspects of Canadian elections such as vote choice, political marketing, party financing, campaign strategy, social media, and electoral regulations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level POLS and permission of the department.


POLS 465.3 — 1/2(3S)
Nationalism and the International System

Designed to introduce the senior undergraduate student to the phenomenon of nationalism as a historical and modern political force, this course focuses on the theoretical and political aspects of nationalism, highlighting its origins, evolution, contradictions, and implications for both the nation-state and the international system.

Prerequisite(s): POLS 261.3 and 262.3 and permission of the department.

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Psychology

PSY 120.3 — 1/2(3L)
Biological and Cognitive Bases of Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major biological and cognitive areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, learning, language, and motivation and emotion.

Note: Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 121.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major social, clinical, cultural and developmental areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of intelligence, development, personality, social and cultural psychology, psychological disorders, treatment, and health, stress, and coping.

Note: Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 207.3 — (3L)
Psychology of Death and Dying

Focuses on the psychological issues relevant to death and dying. Topics to be examined: societal attitudes, cultural differences, coping with dying, dealing with loss and grief, memorialization and funerals, developmental issues across the life span, relevant legal issues, suicide and life threatening behaviour, AIDS and the psychological meaning of death.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 213.3 — 1/2(3L)
Child Development

An examination of the social, emotional, moral, cognitive and physical development of typical children from conception to late childhood. Individual development is considered from a psychological perspective within the contexts of family and culture.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 214.3 — 1/2(3L)
Adolescent Development

An introduction to theories and research methods in adolescent development. Attention is given to normative development in physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains. Students will obtain an understanding of factors that influence normative trajectories and processes; basic theory underlying adolescent research; and strengths and weaknesses of methods in this area.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 216.3 — 1/2(3L)
Psychology of Aging

The study of normal psychological development through maturity to old age. Topics include: consideration of critical issues of research methods; problems of adjustment of the aged such as physical decline, retirement, aloneness, disengagement; the needs and care of the aged, antecedents of successful aging; the psychology of dying and death; theories of aging.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Personality

A systematic survey of basic principles of motivation, learning, conflict and problem solving as applied to the study of personality. Major problem areas and contemporary theories of personality are reviewed.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 223.3 — 1/2(3L)
Abnormal Psychology

Major patterns of abnormal behaviour are reviewed and studied with respect to origins, course and treatment. The focus is upon understanding abnormal behaviour with an integrated knowledge of basic principles of general psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: PSY 222 recommended


PSY 226.3 — 1/2(3L)
Individual Processes in Social Psychology

An examination of social psychological theories and research related to individual processes. Intrapersonal processes such as social cognition, the self, and attitudes, as well as interpersonal processes such as attraction, persuasion, altruism and aggression will be covered through lectures, readings, and assignments.

Formerly:
PSY 221.
Prerequisite(s)
: PSY 121.


PSY 231.3 — 1/2(3L)
Psychology and Law

Examines the role psychology plays in promoting justice within the legal system. Theory, research, and methodology related to the psychology of evidence are reviewed. The focus is on the role psychologists play in obtaining and assessing witness evidence during the pre-trial and trial phases of the legal process.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 235.3 — 2(3L-1P)
Research Methods and Design

Introduces students to both experimental and non-experimental research methods and designs used in psychology. The course focuses on the interplay between research questions, theory, the selection of appropriate research procedures and resulting conclusions. The laboratory component will consist of practical training and application of the concepts discussed in class.

Formerly: PSY 372.6
Prerequisite(s): PSY 233
Note: Four-year and Honours students should take PSY 234 concurrently. Students with credit for PSY 232 or 372 cannot take this course for credit.


PSY 253.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

An introduction to research and theory on the topic of human cognitive functioning. The course will explore how humans attend to, encode and remember their experiences, communicate using both written and spoken language, and engage in higher order processes such as reasoning, problem solving, and decision making.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 255.3 — 1/2(3L)
Human Memory

An introduction to research and theory on the structures and processes involved in human memory. Topics include the evidence for distinct sensory, short-term, and long-term memory stores, the format of representation in memory, and the determinants of effective memory performance.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 120.


PSY 257.3 — 1/2(3L)
Clinical and Counselling Psychology

Review of the relevant topics in clinical and counselling psychology including psycho diagnostic testing, and the major approaches to therapeutic change.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.


PSY 261.3 — 1/2(3L)
Community Psychology

Introduces psychological theories and research on the effects of the physical and social environments on human behaviour and on the design and evaluation of changes which might promote adaptive behaviour.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 121.
Note: Students who have taken PSY 360 may not take this course for credit.


PSY 315.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Advanced Development I Social and Emotional

Introduces students to the theoretical foundations, research designs, and methods used to study social and emotional development. The course will involve lectures and a lab component. In the lab component, students will participate in a collaborative research project.

Formerly: PSY 314
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level Psychology including PSY 233 and 235 and one of PSY 213, 214, or 216.


PSY 316.3 — 2(3P)
Advanced Development II Social and Emotional Research

Students will develop independent research projects designed to answer an empirical question in the domain of social and emotional development. Each student will be responsible (either individually or as a member of a small group) for designing a study, testing participants, analyzing data, and writing up a research report.

Formerly: PSY 314.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 315.


PSY 317.3 — 1(1.5L-1.5P)
Cognitive Development I

Introduces students to an in-depth study of major content areas, theoretical orientations, and research methods which are necessary to advance knowledge in the study of cognitive development. Students will learn about the special features of the cognitive developmental perspective and will conduct research projects in the laboratory component of the course.

Formerly: PSY 314.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units of 200-level psychology, including PSY 233 and 235 one of PSY 213, 214, or 216.


PSY 318.3 — 2(3P)
Cognitive Development II Research

Students will develop independent research projects designed to answer an empirical question in the domain of cognitive development. Each student will be responsible (either individually or as a member of a small group) for designing a study, testing participants, analyzing data, and writing up a research report.

Formerly: PSY 314.
Permission of the department required.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 234 and 317.


PSY 472.6 — 1&2(1L-2P)
BA Honours Thesis

Students will carry out a major project under the supervision of a faculty member, and report the project in the form of an honours thesis. The project will usually involve empirical research.

Prerequisite(s): At least one 3 credit unit 300-level PSY A and one 3 credit unit 300-level PSY B course.
Restriction(s): Enrolment in honours program or written permission of the department.

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Religious Studies

RLST 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
Western Religions in Society and Culture

This class is a critical survey of the history, sources and chief characteristics of major world religions, such as Judaism and Christianity, and includes brief introductions to Islam and New Religious Movements. The history, agency and practice of these religions are considered in the wider multicultural context. We will be attentive to the investigation into the phenomenon called religion, and to the relationships between religion, culture and society.

Note: Students with credit for RLST 110.6 may not take RLST 112 for credit.


RLST 210.3 — 1/2(3L)
Religion and Ecology

This course explores the interplay between a number of religious traditions and ecology by taking a cross-disciplinary approach to the evaluation of issues of complicity, responsibility, guilt, reconciliation and restoration in human-Earth relations.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units RLST courses or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 219.3 — 1/2(3L)
Bible and Western Culture

Explores the influence of the Bible on the culture of the west, ancient and modern, with a particular focus on the role of biblical themes, symbols and characters in art, literature, music and popular culture.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in RLST or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 220.3 — 1/2(3L)
Women in Western Religious Traditions

Study of women in major western religious traditions: influence of conceptual systems and language; women’s embodiment and religion, feminine spirituality, women’s contributions to western faiths, and feminine aspects of divinity.

Formerly:RLST 325.
Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students with credit for RLST 325 may not take this course for credit.


RLST 221.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Christianity

A systematic examination of the beliefs, practices and doctrinal debates in Christianity, with emphasis on diverging theories of revelation, incarnation, redemption and ritual efficacy that shift over time in response to surrounding political and socio-cultural forces.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 222.3 — 1/2(3L)
Mystics Monks and Heretics

Introduces Christianity from the perspective of the contemplative tradition. Commencing with the pre-Christian Greek heritage the course examines the early Christian period of the desert contemplative life in various mystical writings and subsequent expressions of Christian contemplation.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or completion of 30 credit units at the university level.


RLST 225.3 — 1/2(3L)
Perspectives on Jesus

The findings of modern biblical and historical research will be applied to the figure of Jesus as presented in the New Testament, and to the development of doctrine in Christianity.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 226.3 — 1/2(3L)
Religion Globalization and Social Justice

This course offers: 1) a preliminary survey of the destructive and constructive interplay between world religions and forces of globalization; 2) an introduction to ancient and contemporary elements/proponents of social justice within five religious traditions’; 3) an elaboration of tentative, interreligious ethical criteria that might guide the evaluation of religio-political developments in our global context.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units.


RLST 227.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Judaism

An introduction to basic Jewish ideas, beliefs, and practices from the biblical times to the present.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 228.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Jewish Thought

An examination of Jewish theology and treatment of the concepts of God, Torah, Israel and related themes by major Jewish thinkers.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 229.3 — 1/2(3L)
Religion and Sport

This course explores the interplay between religion and sport. These two endeavors represent the ultimate concern for a number of people around the world. We will analyze their similarities and differences in relation to how sport and religion serve as a total identity for some people. We will also map some of the influence and expression of religious traditions in sport. Case studies will include reviewing arguments for considering the Montreal Canadiens and the Saskatchewan Roughriders as religions in their own right.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units RLST or 18 credit units at the university level.


RLST 237.3 — 1/2(3L)
Life After Death in World Religions

This course explores the ideas, beliefs and practices associated with life after death as they are expressed in various religious traditions. The course begins with a survey of afterlife beliefs in ancient cultures (especially Egypt and Mesopotamia), and moves on to afterlife concepts in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions. The course will also introduce afterlife beliefs in Spiritualism, and contemporary scholarship on Near Death Experiences.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units RLST or 18 credit units at university level.


RLST 253.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Old Testament

A basic introduction to the Old Testament, focussing on the historical, literary and theological characteristics of the various writings. Scholarly methods by which they are studied, and their relationship to the history of Israel will also be examined.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students with credit for RLST 250 may not take this course for credit.


RLST 254.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to New Testament

A basic introduction to the New Testament, focussing on the historical, literary and theological characteristics of the various writings. Scholarly methods by which they are studied, and their relationship to Christianity will also be examined.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students with credit for RLST 252 may not take this course for credit.


RLST 277.3 — 1/2(3L)
Community Solidarity and Social Change

This course maps a variety of religious and spiritual perspectives on community, solidarity and social change. It will take a cross-disciplinary approach, which does not assume faith-commitments on the part of students, to explore concepts and practices related to community, solidarity and social change.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units RLST courses or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 280.3 — 1/2(3L)
Methodologies and Approaches to Study of Religions

An introduction to theories and approaches in the academic study of religion. Origins and development of social scientific, historical, phenomenological and comparative approaches will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110 or 24 credit units at the university level.


RLST 298.3 — 1/2(3L)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


RLST 300.3 — 1/2(3L)
Hidden Books of the Bible

This course focuses on the Apocrypha (“Hidden Things”), Hellenistic Jewish books regarded as scripture by some, but not all, Christians, in their historical, literary and cultural contexts, as well as their influence on western culture.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units RLST or 24 credit units at university level.


RLST 303.3 — 1/2(3L)
Goddesses in Myth and History

Investigates the role of goddesses in religion from prehistory to the present, east and west. Combines historical and thematic approaches, focussing on the many roles of the female divine. Ancient goddesses, goddess worship in world religions, and contemporary feminist goddess spirituality, including Wicca, will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in RLST or 48 credit units at the university level.


RLST 314.3 — 1/2(3L)
Issues in Contemporary Catholicism

An analysis of contemporary Roman Catholicism with emphasis on the second Vatican Council (1962-1965) and its effects. Themes include identity of and membership in the church, liturgical renewal, post-conciliar forms of spirituality and community, social doctrine, and moral issues.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university level.


RLST 321.3 — 1/2(3L)
Gender and God Talk

An overview of feminist theological perspectives, both as critiques of traditional culture and theology and as constructions of new visions and ways of religious life.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university level.


RLST 328.3 — 1/2(3L)
Jewish Christian Relations in Historical Perspective

Christianity emerged out of Judaism, and this course examines the relationships that have existed between the two religions through the ages. Both Christian and Jewish sources will be examined to develop a critical perspective on this important aspect of western religious heritage.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university level.


RLST 359.3 — 1/2(3L)
Helpmates Harlots Goddesses and Heroines

Examines historical, social and theological aspects of women’s relationship to the Old and New Testament, the portrayal of women in biblical texts, the interpretation of biblical texts about women, biblical attributions of gender to the divine, the history of women as biblical interpreters, and feminist hermeneutics.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST or WGST course.


RLST 361.3 — 1/2(3L)
Rabbinic Literature

A study of post-biblical Jewish religious literature, including legal, ethical and theological material. Emphasis will be placed on both methodology and content, with illustrative texts read in English.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university.


RLST 362.3 — 1/2(3L)
Monsters and Mischief Makers

This class will examine the construction of morality in religious texts by using the outsider/insider (or neighbor/stranger) question. We will investigate this question further by asking how do the people and things we consider to be like us or not like us help us to determine how to behave, and/or what to believe.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units RLST or 24 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students who completed RLST 398.3: Monsters and Mischief-makers may not take this course for credit.


RLST 363.3 — 1/2(3L)
Early Christian Literature Text and Context

A study of extra-biblical Christian writings up to 150 CE with emphasis on the beliefs of early Christianity, relationship with paganism and Judaism, and the development of internal organizational structures.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university.
Note: Students with credit for RLST 309 or 311 may not take this course for credit.


RLST 365.3 — 1/2(3L)
Bible and Film

An examination of the uses of the Bible in film, including epic films, contemporary retellings of biblical stories, and the use of biblical themes and motifs in cinema. Uncovers the many ways in which biblical-theological themes shape and are shaped by contemporary culture.

Prerequisite(s): RLST 110, 253, 254, ENG 298, or 30 credit units at the university level.


RLST 375.3 — 1/2(3L)
Religion and Science

Investigates the historical and transcultural approach to the relationship between religion and science. Contemporary approaches to issues at the intersection of religion and science are also analyzed with emphasis on the influence of physics, evolutionary biology, ecology, non-Western science and cosmology.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university level.


RLST 377.3
Living Community Solidarity and Social Change

This course offers students an academic framework for grounded reflection on religious studies concepts covered in the prerequisite course. It will be centred on an eight- or twelve-week placement with the St. Thomas More College Intercordia Program in a cross-cultural context. Students will apply concepts from RLST 277, which explored the nexus amongst religion, community, solidarity and social change.


RLST 382.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sex, God and Rock n’ Roll Re-Vamping the Sacred

This course on religion, music, and pop culture will investigate the intimate connections between human musicality and sexuality, and assess their impact on definitions of divinity and the sacred. Theoretical issues include the ideology of sacred/profane dichotomies, musical/sexual taboos, and the politics of gender, race and class as expressed in ritual and liturgy.

Prerequisite(s): 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university level.
Note: Students with credit for RLST Special Topics: Sex, God and Rock n Roll: Re-Vamping the Sacred may not take RLST 382 for credit.


RLST 391.3 — 1/2(3S)
Readings in Western Religions

Exposes the student to primary source materials. Emphasis is placed on individual study and research.

Prerequisite(s): A 200-level RLST course or 48 credit units at the university level.


RLST 398.3 — 1/2(3S)
Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


RLST 412.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Religions and Culture

A critical examination of religious ideas, beliefs, and practices in varied cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 300-level RLST or 18 credit units RLST or permission of the department.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.


RLST 413.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Religious Thought

An advanced seminar in contemporary religious thought focusing on an important theme such as the nature of religious belief, the problem of suffering and evil, or religious pluralism.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 300-level RLST or 18 credit units RLST or permission of the department.
Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topic covered in each offering differs substantially. Students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different.

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Sociology

SOC 111.3 — 1/2(3L)
Foundations in Sociology Society Structure Process

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines theories and methods for studying changes to the nature and organization of society from pre-modern, to modern and post-modern. Students will be introduced to core sociological concepts used to understand social inequality, social order, social change, and globalization.

Formerly: Part of SOC 110.6.
Note: Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 112.3 — 1/2(3L)
Foundations in Sociology Social Construction of Everyday Life

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines how we come to understand and experience ourselves and the world around us and how we create culture. Students will be introduced to the study of culture, socialization, social interaction, identity formation and self-fashioning, the social construction of class, gender and race, age, deviance, and other social phenomena.

Formerly: Part of SOC 110.6.
Note: Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course credit.


SOC 203.3 — 1/2(3L)
Race and Ethnic Relations in Canada

An introduction to and general overview of the various theoretical perspectives on race and ethnic relations and ethnicity. Addresses such issues as assimilation, racism, ethnic persistence, multiculturalism, and domination.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 210.3 — 1/2(3L)
Families Social Structure and Social Change

This course examines diverse family patterns, paying particular attention to how economic, political and cultural factors influence families. While the focus of the course is on contemporary Canadian families, we will also consider changing family patterns in a global perspective, and will look at the historical development of family forms in Canada and beyond.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC
Note: Students with credit for SOC 207.6 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 211.3 — 1/2(3L)
Families Gender Relations and Social Inequality

This course focuses on everyday life in families and intimate relationships, and exposes students to empirical and theoretical explorations of how micro-level interactions are shaped by and contribute to broader social inequalities.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level SOC
Note: Students with credit for SOC 207.6 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 217.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Contemporary Religious Movements

A survey of contemporary religious movements with emphasis upon structural and functional similarities and differences.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 224.3 — 1/2(3L)
Collective Behaviour

The study of social movements, institutional formation, and other collective phenomena such as fads, crazes, manias, panics, rumours, riots and mob outbursts. Collective behaviour theory and related sociological approaches are surveyed and applied.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 232.3 — 1/2(3L)
Methods of Social Research

This course provides an introduction to sociological research methods. The course will involve consideration of the relationship between social theory and research, as well as various features of both qualitative and quantitative research. Topics include ethical issues, techniques, and tasks associated with research design, data collections, data analysis and evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 233.3 — 1/2(3L)
Introduction to Sociological Theory

An introduction to sociological theory from its early origins to the contributions of its main founders, Marx, Weber and Durkheim, as well as a selection of contemporary developments including feminism.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 244.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Mass Media in Canada

Introduction to the sociological study of mass media institutions in Canadian society. Primary focus on the theoretical and historical context of print, broadcast and film media. Issues of ownership, regulation and the socialization of media workers will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 246.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ideology and Mass Communication

Introduction to the study of ways in which doctrines, opinions or ways of thinking of certain individuals or groups come to dominate the content of our mass media. Primary focus on the “manufacture of consent” in our society through an analysis of media messages about work, consumption and leisure in Canadian society.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110).


SOC 260.3 — 1/2(3L)
Social Change and Global Solidarity

An examination of global inequality guided by theories of social stratification and social change. Special attention is devoted to the nature, causes, and consequences of socio-cultural changes in the contemporary world.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 111 and 112 (formerly SOC 110) or 12 credit units in the social sciences or special permission of the instructor.


SOC 261.3 — SP/SU
Engaging Social Change and Global Solidarity

Brings students face to face with people, cultures, and struggles for justice in another region of the world. The course will give students hands-on opportunities to meet and discuss current issues with people at an everyday-life level. Finally, it will expand their world view and challenge them to think critically and concretely about global justice and solidarity within the framework provided by sociological perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 260.3 and permission of instructor.


SOC 304.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Marxist Sociology

An introduction to the study of contemporary Marxist social thought. Focuses specifically on the ontological, conceptual and methodological issues, problems and implications inherent in the divergent schools of Marxist sociology.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 233.


SOC 305.3 — 1/2(3L)
Ethnic Stratification

The study of the ideology and practice of ethnic inequality from a comparative perspective, and a critical review of theories and research in the area, including analyses of the stratification approach, colonial model, political economy, critical theory, and other models.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 306.3 — 1/2(3L)
Contemporary Class Structure

An examination of theoretical models and empirical studies of the structure of social class relations in advanced industrial society. The course will examine patterns of class relations in the western industrialized nations, and will also study selected dimensions of global class structure and inequality.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 321.3 — 1/2(3L)
Sociology of Religion

An analysis of religion in terms of the processes (e.g., secularization and urbanization), which have affected the religious institutions of the West, and of the social and personality structures which, in interaction, shape religion and are shaped by it.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.


SOC 324.3 — 1/2(3L)
Multiculturalism Theories Debates and Realities

Is multiculturalism dead? Is multiculturalism the right model for addressing increased religious, ethnic and racial pluralism? Multiculturalism is a heavily debated concept. This course discusses the core theories and debates around multiculturalism. In order to properly understand both the claimed ‘successes’ and ‘failures’ of multiculturalism, this course will examine the contours of multiculturalism as a philosophy, policy, and practice.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC


SOC 340.3 — 1/2(3L)
Marriage Family and Society

Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of changing patterns of marriage and the family within the contemporary social structure and on consequences and resulting trends from such structural changes.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC including SOC 207.


SOC 350.3 — 1/2(3L)
Modern Society and Modern Thought

A comprehensive introduction to the history, sociology, and ideas of modern western society, which examines the formation and consolidation of modernity: the development of the modern state; the modern capitalist economy and the industrial revolution; and with an emphasis on the emergence of the Enlightenment and the social sciences.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units SOC.
Note: Students with credit for SOC 296 may not take this course for credit.


SOC 360.3 — 1/2(3L)
Globalization and Social Justice

Explores the major theories of globalization, global social stratification and social justice through issues of risks, challenges and opportunities of contemporary social life. Central concerns are the following three themes: what is globalization, what is happening; and what are people doing that is shaping the outcome of the process?

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in sociology, including SOC 110.6 or SOC 111.3 and SOC 112.3 or permission of the instructor.


SOC 411.3 — 1/2(3S)
Family I Development in Research and Theory

Selected topics concerning marriage and family behaviour: recent developments in research and theory.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 207.


SOC 412.3 — 1/2(3S)
Advanced Seminar in Ethnic Relations

Theoretical aspects of inter-ethnic processes. Comparative analysis of empirical research on ethnic minorities within Canada and other selected societies.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC.


SOC 413.3 — 1/2(3S)
Seminar in Sociology of Religion

An advanced seminar in sociological theories of religious behaviour.

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units SOC including SOC 217 or 321.

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Spanish

SPAN 114.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Elementary Spanish I

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language, both oral and written, vocabulary building, essential structures, and basic grammar. The course also provides insight into Hispanic culture through a variety of activities such as readings, music, and videos.

Formerly: SPAN 115.
Note: Students who have completed Spanish 20 (Grade 11 Spanish) or have completed Spanish 30 (Grade 12 Spanish), may not take this course for credit. Students who have some background in Spanish or who have taken any other courses in Spanish and native speakers of Spanish are not allowed to register in this course. Students with credit for SPAN 115 may not take this course for credit.


SPAN 117.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Elementary Spanish II

A Spanish language course that builds on skills acquired in SPAN 114, completing the study of basic Spanish grammar, with emphasis on oral and written communication. The course aims to develop an appreciation of Hispanic culture.

Formerly: SPAN 115.
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 114.
Note: Students who have completed Spanish 30 may not take this course for credit. Students who have taken high school Spanish courses or any other Spanish courses and native speakers of Spanish are not allowed to register in this course. Students with credit for SPAN 115 may not take this course for credit.


SPAN 250.3 — 1/2(3L)
Historical Trends of the Spanish Language

Have you ever wondered where Spanish came from? What is the relationship between Spanish and other Romance languages? Why are some Spanish words similar to their French, Italian and Portuguese counterparts while others are completely different? Why does the Spanish accent vary so greatly across geographic boundaries? This course answers those questions by examining the evolution of Spanish from its Latinate origins to the contemporary language we speak today. Special attention will be paid to the watershed political and historical events and social movements in Spain from the XIII century onwards, so as to illustrate how such factors are mirrored in the phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic constructions of modern Spanish.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 18 credit units of university courses
Note: SPAN 114 is recommended. This course is taught in English.


SPAN 251.3 — 1/2(3L)
The Spanish of Latin Americans

What is the difference between the Spanish spoken in Spain and the mother tongue of more than 193 million speakers in Latin and South America? Are the distinctions merely an accent change due to geography or are there other social factors at play? The Spanish of Latin Americans provides an overview of the linguistic variation found in Latin American Spanish. Core topics include the concept of language variation, the fundamental dissimilarities between Peninsular and American Spanish (including the use of usted, voseo, seseo and yeísmo), the indigenous and African contributions and social variation within the continent.

Permission of the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 18 credit units of university courses.
Note: SPAN 114 is recommended. This course is taught in English.

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Ukrainian

UKR 114.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Elementary Ukrainian I

Develops elementary proficiency in speaking, reading, understanding, and writing Ukrainian. Basic grammatical structures, sound patterns, spelling and vocabulary will be studied. Students will be introduced to Ukrainian life and culture, politics, geography and society.

Formerly: UKR 115.
Note: Students who have completed Ukrainian 20 (Grade 11 Ukrainian) or have completed Ukrainian 30 (Grade 12 Ukrainian), may not take this course for credit. Students who have some background in Ukrainian or who have taken any other courses in Ukrainian and native speakers of Ukrainian are not allowed to register in this course. Students with credit for UKR 115 may not take this course for credit.


UKR 117.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Elementary Ukrainian II

This course is a continuation of UKR 114. It develops elementary proficiency in speaking, reading, understanding, and writing Ukrainian. Basic grammatical structures, sound patterns, spelling and vocabulary will be studied. Students will be introduced to Ukrainian life and culture, politics, geography and society. Students will develop the ability to understand spoken Ukrainian and respond to it within certain everyday topics.

Formerly: UKR 115.
Prerequisite(s): UKR 114.
Note: Students who have completed Ukrainian 30 may not take this course for credit. Students who have a background in Ukrainian or have taken any other Ukrainian courses and native speakers of Ukrainian are not allowed to register in this course. Students with credit for UKR 115 may not take this course for credit.


UKR 214.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Intermediate Ukrainian I

This course will concentrate on improving speaking, reading, and writing skills by further expanding the basic syntactic, morphological, lexical, and phonetic structure of modern Ukrainian. Students will be introduced to contemporary life and culture of Ukraine.

Formerly: UKR 215.
Prerequisite(s): UKR 114 and 117.
Note: Native speakers of Ukrainian are not allowed to register in this course. Students with credit for UKR 215 may not take this course for credit.


UKR 217.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Intermediate Ukrainian II

This course builds on skills acquired in UKR 214. Emphasis is placed on improving oral and written skills through the extensive study of Ukrainian grammar. This course will continue providing students with a view of contemporary life and culture.

Formerly: UKR 215.
Prerequisite(s): UKR 214.
Note: Native speakers of Ukrainian are not allowed to register in this course. Students with credit for UKR 215 may not take this course for credit.


UKR 314.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Advanced Ukrainian I

Selected readings, composition exercises and a grammar review focusing on phonetics and morphology are used to improve the student's command of oral and written Ukrainian. There is no translation and the course is conducted entirely in Ukrainian.

Formerly: UKR 315.
Prerequisite(s): UKR 214, 217.
Note: Native speakers of Ukrainian may not take this course for credit.


UKR 317.3 — 1/2(3L-1T)
Advanced Ukrainian II

Selected readings, composition exercises and a grammar review are used to improve the student's command of oral and written Ukrainian.

Formerly: UKR 316.
Prerequisite(s): UKR 214, 217.
Note: Native speakers of Ukrainian may not take this course for credit.

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