STM is hosting three conferences in 2018:

  • STM hosted the "Integral Ecology for the Common Good: Catholic Perspectives on Science, Sustainability, and Justice" Conference (March 22nd & March 23rd 2018).
  • In August 2018, we are providing the space for the 2nd International Conference of the Saskatchewan Center for Science and Religion titled "Our Place in the Cosmos?: Humanity, Spirituality, and the Awesome Universe" (August 13th and August 14th ). Call for Papers now available (due April 15th)Please view additional information below.
  • In October 2018 , we are hosting the "Re-Working Class: Setting A New Agenda for Canadian Labour and Working-Class History" conference (October 12th & 13th 2018). Call for Papers is now closed. 


CATHOLIC STUDIES AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE COMMON GOOD CONFERENCE

Integral Ecology for the Common Good: Catholic Perspectives on Science, Sustainability, and Justice

Please follow this link  to find information about this past confererence (March 22-23, 2018).



STM is looking forward to the Saskatchewan Center for Science and Religion (2nd International) Conference titled "Our Place in the Cosmos?: Humanity, Spirituality, and the Awesome Universe" (August 13-14, 2018)

Call for Papers is now on!

One often cited premise is that the work of modern scientists like Copernicus and Darwin served to remove our home planet and humanity from their special place in the cosmos as previously upheld by religious and spiritual traditions. Nonetheless, religion and spirituality have proven to be an enduring feature of the human landscape even for many scientists, in part, because religious and spiritual expressions have themselves shifted to tolerate, accommodate, and even promote new cosmologies. Additionally, more contemporary developments in scientific theory such as: big bang cosmology, quantum field theory, ‘mitochondrial Eve’, the multiverse, the Gaia hypothesis, the singularity, or the anthropic principle have lent themselves to religious and spiritual readings. Compounding the tensions active here, many of these religious and spiritual readings lie outside the aims, scopes, and intensions of the scientists who first formulated these concepts.


The second international conference of the Saskatchewan Center for Science and Religion seeks to wade into these issues and provide a platform to start and deepen interdisciplinary conversations amongst scientists, social scientists, and humanity scholars concerning the roles and place of humanity within the dynamic, fascinating, and sometimes awe-inspiring cosmos that comes into view via modern and after-modern science. In light of our goal to foster such dialogue, we invite paper proposals addressing the conference theme from academics engaging in a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, including scientists and scholars of science and religion. Those selected to present will join the following exciting keynotes on the conference program:
Br. Guy Consolmagno S.J., PhD (Director, Vatican Observatory), Jeff Baker, PhD (Chair, Indigenous Education at University of Saskatchewan) with Elder Wilfred Buck, BEd, PBCE (Science Facilitator, Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre), and Loriliai Biernacki, PhD (Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Religious Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder).


Location and Submission Information:
The conference will be hosted by the Department of Religion and Culture at St. Thomas More College in Saskatoon, SK.

To have your paper considered for the conference program, please submit a 100 – 150 word abstract of a paper that can be presented in 20 minutes, along with 100 word biography, and your current CV to info@science-religion.ca by April 15th, 2018. Those chosen to present will be informed shortly after that date. Co- presented papers are welcome.

Questions from academics can be directed to the chair of the conference planning committee, Dr. Christopher Hrynkow, at chrynkow@stmcollege.ca.


STM is looking forward to hosting the "Re-Working Class: Setting A New Agenda for Canadian Labour and Working-Class History" conference on October 12-13, 2018. 

Re-Working Class: Setting A New Agenda for Canadian Labour and Working-Class History
Sponsored by Labour/Le Travail, the Canadian Committee on Labour History and St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan
October 12-13, 2018
St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan

This two-day symposium aims to reassess the study and teaching of the history of the Canadian working class in order to chart a positive path for future study and activism. Re-Working Class will reflect on the past, present and future of working-class history and the working-class experience, assessing old debates and raising new ones, charting new directions for the field, and exploring how we might reinvigorate the study and teaching of labour.

Since the first issue of Labour/Le Travail in 1976, working-class history has evolved as a vibrant field of study, although the questions that animate the field have changed over time. Trends in historical study have veered away from examinations of class, labour mobilization and unions, yet we believe that analyzing work and class relations, in conjunction with other axes of power such as ‘race,’ gender, colonialism and sexuality, remains central to our understanding of history, as well as current debates about economic inequality, capitalism and the lives of working people.  Within and outside the university, there are some encouraging signs of revitalized debates within working-class history, political economy, public history, the labour movement and the left.

In this light, we welcome proposals for individual papers, panels, roundtables, debates and cultural presentations (discussions of film, performance, visual art), that address the study and teaching of labour and working-class history in educational and heritage institutions, worker education programs, and cultural initiatives. Papers that address the Canadian working class in a North American and global context are welcomed.

Some subsidies will be available for grad students and the precariously employed.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

    • What is the relationship between the histories of labour and settler colonialism?
    • How can we address the historical complexities of multiple forms of labour: paid, unpaid, coerced, indentured?
    • How might comparative, global, and transnational labour history research inform Canadian working class history and visa versa?
    • What theoretical perspectives have aided or inhibited our understanding of working-class histories?
    • Which time periods, groups of workers, and themes need new or renewed attention? 
    • What is the relationship between historical and contemporary analyses, labour studies and labour history?
    • What does politically-engaged history mean in the 21st century?
    • How is labour history communicated in educational institutions, and to the public in museums, public history and through popular culture? 
    • What is the relationship between labour history and labour movement praxis?
    • What new opportunities for dissemination and outreach does the 21st century afford?

PLEASE SEND PROPOSALS, INCLUDING THE TITLE OF THE PAPER OR PANEL, A SHORT ABSTRACT OF THE PRESENTATION (UP TO 300 WORDS), AND A SHORT BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT TO: CCLH2018@GMAIL.COM BY 28 FEBRUARY 2018.